Current Opinion in Neurology

Feed Category: 

Enhancing rehabilitation and functional recovery after brain and spinal cord trauma with electrical neuromodulation

imagePurpose of review
This review discusses recent advances in the rehabilitation of motor deficits after traumatic brain injury (TBI) and spinal cord injury (SCI) using neuromodulatory techniques.
Recent findings
Neurorehabilitation is currently the only treatment option for long-term improvement of motor functions that can be offered to patients with TBI or SCI. Major advances have been made in recent years in both preclinical and clinical rehabilitation. Activity-dependent plasticity of neuronal connections and circuits is considered key for successful recovery of motor functions, and great therapeutic potential is attributed to the combination of high-intensity training with electrical neuromodulation. First clinical case reports have demonstrated that repetitive training enabled or enhanced by electrical spinal cord stimulation can yield substantial improvements in motor function. Described achievements include regaining of overground walking capacity, independent standing and stepping, and improved pinch strength that recovered even years after injury.
Summary
Promising treatment options have emerged from research in recent years using neurostimulation to enable or enhance intense training. However, characterizing long-term benefits and side-effects in clinical trials and identifying patient subsets who can benefit are crucial. Regaining lost motor function remains challenging.

Feed Item Url: 
https://journals.lww.com/co-neurology/Fulltext/2019/12000/Enhancing_rehabilitation_and_functional_recovery.9.aspx

Novel synaptic plasticity enhancer drug to augment functional recovery with rehabilitation

imagePurpose of review
Stroke is a devastating illness which severely attenuates quality of life because of paralysis. Despite recent advances in therapies during acute phase such as thrombolytic therapy, clinical option to intervene the process of rehabilitation is limited. No pharmacological intervention that could enhance the effect of rehabilitation has not been established. Recent articles, which are summarized in the review article, reported novel small compound which accelerates training-dependent motor function recovery after brain damage.
Recent findings
A novel small compound, edonerpic maleate, binds to collapsin response mediator protein 2 (CRMP2) and enhance synaptic plasticity leading to the acceleration of rehabilitative training-dependent functional recovery after brain damage in rodent and nonhuman primate. The clinical trial to test this effect in human is now ongoing. Future preclinical and clinical studies will delineate the potentials of this compound.
Summary
A novel CRMP2-binding small compound, edonerpic maleate, accelerates motor function recovery after brain damage in rodent and nonhuman primate.

Feed Item Url: 
https://journals.lww.com/co-neurology/Fulltext/2019/12000/Novel_synaptic_plasticity_enhancer_drug_to_augment.8.aspx