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Excessive antibiotic prescriptions for children in low-, middle-income countries

Children in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) are receiving an average of 25 antibiotic prescriptions during their first five years of life, an excessive amount that could harm the children's ability to fight pathogens as well as increase antibiotic resistance worldwide, according to a new study from the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) and Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

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Paving the way to healing complex trauma

A major study led by researchers at La Trobe University in Australia has identified key themes that will be used to inform strategies to support Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander parents in the first years of their children's lives.

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Flu season is here, and it's coming for your kids

The flu is out in force. And so far this season, it's been hitting children the hardest.

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Even in sporty Seattle, most kids aren't getting enough exercise

People who live in and around Seattle are among the nation's most active. The region is an outdoor recreation haven for both locals and visitors who enjoy hiking, biking and kayaking.

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Groupthink: Small distinctions, large effects

It's hard to overlook the green and orange scarfs. On weekends, one often sees children sporting such apparel at the back of the Kids' Corner of the Deutsches Museum, sitting in front of a computer. What has drawn their interest are the photos and videos on the screen, which feature children very like themselves. In fact these kids even have the same colored scarves, and it's clear that the onlookers can immediately relate to them. The green and orange scarves serve as markers that divide them into two distinguishable groups. Their young viewers can decide with a click which group they find more attractive. "The result is very striking," says Antonia Misch, a developmental psychologist at LMU. Children who are themselves wearing green scarves consistently rate their onscreen counterparts who are adorned with the same badge as more likable than those with orange scarves, and vice versa, even though their own scarves were randomly distributed to them. However, if one then tells them that because of a bug in the program, they can only engage with members of the other group, the differences in their assessments of the groups vanish.

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Is it OK for young kids to watch YouTube?

Kids love YouTube. According to one study, more than half of American children between eight and twelve years old say they watch YouTube and other online videos every day, despite the fact that YouTube's terms of service say the online platform is designed for people ages thirteen and up.

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Bolstered mother-child bonds at heart of research

Known as 'the thief that steals motherhood," postpartum depression (PPD) not only obstructs a mother's capacity for understanding and enjoying her baby, but puts children at risk for behavioral and cognitive problems.

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One boy's battle back from mysterious polio-like illness

(HealthDay)—Last October, 15-year-old Alec Woodruff developed a strange-sounding cough. Less than a week later, he was fighting for his life in the hospital, partially paralyzed and with a tube in his throat attached to a ventilator because just breathing was a task he could no longer do on his own.

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One in three parents report skipping doctor, dentist appointment

(HealthDay)—One in three parents have skipped a doctor or dentist appointment in the past year because they could not afford to pay for visits or find transportation, according to the results of a survey released Nov. 18 by Nemours Children's Health System.

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Survival worse for nonwhite children with Hodgkin lymphoma

(HealthDay)—Among children with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) enrolled in phase III trials, nonwhite patients have an increased risk for death, according to a study published in the Nov. 10 issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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